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Simultaneous Striking

James

Administrator
Staff member
What are there advantages and disadvantages of striking simultaneously with both hands(etc)?

Striking with one hand at a time seems very ingrained into the martial psyche but there must be many situations where simultaneous striking would be a huge advantage over a single strike.

Of course there are so many intricacies in discussing this matter. Even a fraction of a second in combat can be a vastly complex subject when examined indepth.

In miltary warfare there is a tactic of simultaneously attacking 2 or more targets so as to cause utter chaos to the enemy. One part cannot give warning to the other and even if one attack is blocked there is still the chance that the other attack will succeed.

What are the best stances/postures to make simultaneous striking the most effective? What situations should simultaneous striking techniques be used and what situations should they definitely not be used?

As single attacks are the norm in martial arts and as single attacks are ingrained into the psyche of most martial artists/street fighters then he who masters simultaneous striking will have a huge advantage as the skill is unexpected and therefore unpreperared for in defence training. In fact it is the very training that the opponent has practiced in order to defend against one attack that will often leave him open to the double attack.

The enemy's attention can only be in one place per moment and so becomes divided and confused when 2 attacks come in at the same time. Standard/trained defensive measures may block one attack(although this defence response will be degraded due to the surprise and attention dividing etc) but the othe attack should get through to the target.

If you are interested in training in this method it is suggested that you practice for a while with bagwork etc before incorporating the techniques into your sparring.

When training simultaneous striking be sure to be aware of which strikes are 'symmetrical' and which are 'asymetrical'. Also make a note of the various ranges possible for different techniques. In general the idea is to strike simultaneously above and below the eyeline and/or to the left and right of the field of vision etc-always seeking to divide the enemy's attention with 2 credible threats coming in from different directions.

The disadvantage of simultaneous striking is that both our arms leave their defensive positions theoretically leaving our head and bodies open to enemy attack. So care has to be taken to strike at the 'safest time' to help avoid being hit first. Also as you strike and your arms both move outwards let them move in a way that blocks/redirects common enemy attacks (or an incoming enemy attack).

The above article is an example of the beginning stages of a deep focus exercise as advocated in the martial section of my website.
http://www.virtuescience.com/self-defence.html