VirtueScience.com Home
Character/Virtue
Character/Virtue
Natural Wellbeing
Natural Wellbeing
Deeper Subjects
Deeper Subjects
Self Defense
Self Defense
Financial Freedom
Financial Freedom

You are here: Index location Esoteric Wisdom location An excerpt from Ivo Salzinger's Revelatio Secretorum Artis

This is an excerpt from Ivo Salzinger's Revelatio Secretorum Artis, a preface to his 8 volume edition of Bl. Raymond Lull's works, published in Germany in the early 18th century, and reprinted as Raymundi Lulli Opera Omnia, Ivo Salzinger editor, 8 vols., Mainz, 1721-1742 (reprint Stegmüller Frankfurt, 1965) Nearly all the references interspersed in the text refer to the said edition, with volume and page numbers etc. As this edition only exists in Latin, the references are left untranslated.

Lullianarts.net

The Secret of Figure V

The Teacher:
Beneath the metaphorical surface of Figure V, I concealed many Secrets of my Art from my enemies, My Son, and now I will reveal some of them to you in particular.

The First is that the Virtues are instruments for acquiring science and expelling ignorance, and that vices, on the contrary, are instruments for holding on to ignorance and disowning science. From this we infer that "if S wants to have a great Figure in V, let it receive a virtuous habit from EIN and enter into AVYZ, and give N to A, Y and blue V, and give I to red V and Z, and beware of associating with R. (Doctor Illum. in Art. Comp. de Fig. V. Dist. 1. p. 1. fol. 4.). And let him apply the thirteenth mode of my Ars Compendiosa, i.e. the Mode of Conversion and Perversion, because this mode leads one to know the mode whereby S is converted from ignorance to science, and perverted from science into ignorance, and from Y into Z, and from Z into y, and from blue V into red V, and from red (Doctor Illum. in Art. Comp. Dist. 2. p. 1. fol. 16.) The knowledge and practical use of Figure V is so necessary to this Art that without them, no one can become perfect in it.

My Son, humility makes wise men out of Idiots, and conceit turns Doctors into ignorant men. And if even a slight craving for vainglory, or some self-love, or embarrassment to confess one's ignorance, can deprive us of knowing the truth about natural things, and keep us on the wrong path for thirty, forty or more years, and even for an entire lifetime, then consider all the evil that can arise from the cesspool of multiple serious vices in a man enslaved by sin. If someone taught you the art of building a Telescope so noble and excellent that with it you could look into the most hidden extremities of the earth, the depths of the sea, the most concealed recesses of the celestial bodies, and see them as clearly as if they were brought right before your eyes, would he not be supplying you with a great and noble instrument for gaining science about sensual things? But then if he taught you the art of perfecting your own eyes to the point that, without any optical tube, you were able to freely penetrate and scan with utmost clarity all the above things in the realm of corporeal nature, would he not be providing you with an even greater and nobler instrument? He certainly would. Now the latter instrument is within you, whereas the former is external to you, and inner perfection is within is always greater than outward perfection; so as soon as you found out about such an art, you would set about to work on it immediately, if you were wise.

The Disciple:
By all means, my Father, and I would want to do it, and would do it if it were possible; but this is impossible during this mortal lifetime.

The Teacher:
True, but there is something even greater than the said work, whereby what is impossible in this mortal life becomes possible in the next life, and whereby this possibility is demonstrated to the intellect and shown to your eyes with as much certitude and clarity as your own face in a sensual mirror.

The Disciple:
Father, I entreat you, tell me what this is!

The Teacher:
The said Secret of figure V and the Science of the secrets of its principles, and the secret way of the way to work with them; now if you acquire these two things, you will have two instruments, one within you and the other external to you. With these you will not only attain the things I said, but you will penetrate the truth and truths about everything that can be known, more clearly with your intellectual eye than with the said Telescope (if you had one), and with your sensual eyes, you will be able to contemplate the entirety of corporeal nature.

The Disciple:
If you describe most excellent foodstuff to a starving man without giving him any, you do not extinguish his hunger, but only make him hungrier. Likewise, what you are saying does not mitigate my avidity, but only kindles it all the more.

The Teacher:
From a good and great medium, a good and great end can follow, and thus I endeavor to kindle a great appetite for Virtue in you, so it can be a great medium for you to reach a great end of great science through great virtue, and great virtue through great science; because I do not want either alone without the other, nor would science without virtue be of any use to you. Have you not read, my Son, how my Philosophy of Love complained about men who love Science, her sister, more dearly than herself? "The Reason why my sister has more lovers than I, is that as men begin learning science, they begin to love it on account of me. And once they know the Philosophy of Science, they love it, and they have written many books on it, and invented many Arts, and they take great delight in loving these, but not in loving me, nor my Philosophy, which is proper to my own essence and nature; and so, when they want to love me, they do not know how to love, nor are they able to understand my conditions as virtuously as they understand the truths of the things they learn. And this is because they spend much time and labor to learn the sciences of truth and intellect, but not to learn the sciences of love and goodness. This is a great injury and sin against me, and does much harm to many lovers of science, because as they know more and more without loving either me, or goodness, they become all the more clever in doing evil and in deceiving and betraying each other. And this is why I weep and lament in sadness and desolation." (Doctor Illum. in Praef. Phil. Amor.)

Earlier, near the end of the first Chapter, I said that there are two gates which give access to my science, which are the Intellect and the Will, and both of them necessarily require blue V., but the latter needs it more than the former, because the latter perfects its followers and wants them to be more perfect than does the former. Let me now begin to lay open the inner workings of this Figure, and to explain the symmetry of its parts and their benefit for reaching the said goal.

The Second Secret.
In Figure V there is something external, and something internal. Outside are the seven Virtues and the seven Vices, as you see in the figure. Inside are the seven letters of the Virtues and the seven letters of the Vices, namely BCDEFGHIKLMNOP. What is outside is open and what is inside is concealed.

The Disciple:
How are the letters concealed? Does each letter not plainly stand for its principle, like a sign for the thing it signifies?

The Teacher:
True, but this is not the only thing for which a letter stands. Now you must know that Principles are particular, but letters are universal, which they would not be if they only signified one thing in particular. For instance, if B signified nothing more than Faith, C nothing more than Hope and D nothing more than Charity, BCD would be just as particular as Faith, Hope and Charity; and if this were so, my Art would not be universal, but merely particular, because it would have no universal Principles, but only particular ones. And this basic knowledge was hidden from those who set aside my alphabet letters and introduced new, particular signs of their own invention, believing that this would make the Great Art more perfect and easier to use. Now given that Faith, Hope and Charity are particular, and BCD are universal and can signify these, as well as many other particulars, it is obvious that while in BCD these three meanings are open, all the others are concealed, and this is one of the greatest Secrets of my Art.

The Disciple:
Do these things you are now disclosing about Figure V also apply to the other Figures as well, namely ASX etc. or only to figure V?

The Teacher:
They apply to all the Figures. In Figure A, the letter B signifies not only Goodness, C - Greatness, D - Duration etc. but any one of these letters can signify any one of the Dignities in God or in creatures. And you can deduce this Secret from the difference between the Figures of my Ars Compendiosa and those of my Ars Demonstrativa, in which Figures A and X do not contain all the same terms, and you can also see this in my Ars Generalis Ultima and my other Arts, in which I attributed many varied meanings to one and the same letter: and this observation applies not only to the parts of the figures which include the letters and principles inscribed around the figures' circumference, but also includes each Figure as a whole, by referring to the central letter of a figure; now for instance the central letter of Figure A signifies not only GOD, although it is primarily and originally attributed to Him, but it can signify Angel, man, the Chaos, or any given particular or individual creature. This is why we take, or suppose Figure A to be a certain universal with GOD as its particular subject. (Doctor Illum. in Lect. Fig. Art. Dem. de fig. A. fol. 2.)

The Disciple:
Father, if this is as you say, how is it possible to distinguish the meanings of the letters and to discern how many meanings are hidden in each letter?

The Teacher:
In the practice of my Liber Magnum Contemplationis, Volume three Book five, I showed you practically, all along, that any letter of the alphabet can be first freely chosen to stand for general as well as specific Principles for making demonstrations with them, provided that there be natural order among the letters, which you should pay attention to as you can always see it latent in my Tables contained in the said Book, if you have followed and understood and firmly committed to memory the proportions of my universal geometric forms, which I noted down all the way through to the end of the Magna Lectura Artis Compendiosae and its second and third Distinctions. The eminent excellence of this artifice which substitutes alphabet letters for terms, and which I partly described above together with its admirable use, should be convincing enough, but it also appears clearly enough in your elegant Logistics discovered by your more recent, very subtle Geometers. Although this method is particularly contracted to number and quantity, and is therefore contained within my method like a particular in its universal, it makes the Demonstrations of Geometric Theorems much easier to produce than did the old methods.

The Third Secret, greater than the preceding one, lies in discovering the general hidden Systems I concealed beneath the order and number of letters. If I did not reveal this to you, my Sons, out of love for my Lord - and I desire not only to lead you to this knowledge, but to draw you to it by every means - you could not possibly track it down, no matter how much or how ingeniously you studied, unless you happened receive a direct infusion of supernal Light, and this usually happens only to a few. You can find out what this hidden system is by learning from the example of Figure V (and you can apply what I will explain here, to the other Figures in their own way). You can sense with your senses that there are seven letters of the alphabet in Figure V which signify the seven Virtues, and seven letters which signify the seven Vices. And since you have understood intellectually from what we said earlier that letters are universal signs, and the Virtues and Vices are particular significations, and all universals agree with concordance and all particulars agree with difference, so that many diverse particulars can concord in one universal, and they must necessarily concord in it because all difference necessarily contains concordance; and given that every universal regulates and directs every particular it contains, particulars are confirmed by the virtue and power of universals, and not vice versa. (Doctor Illum. in Comp. Art. Dem. Dist. 2. Reg. 16. fol. 83. Tom. 3.) and thus, the letters of Figure V denote not only Virtues and Vices, but include within their scope many other particulars which they signify, regulate and direct.

The Disciple:
But how can one know with infallible certainty which particulars, and how many, are included in these universals?

The Teacher:
You can know this with infallible certainty by applying the hidden System of these letters.

The Disciple:
But this hidden System remains hidden from me.

The Teacher:
So I will open for you what is hidden in this metaphor by using the following metaphor. Suppose you see many lines on a white sheet. One is red, another is black, the third is green and the fourth is blue, so that they each have a different color. Suppose that you are investigating the concordance in this difference, and you are holding a ruler (or yardstick, in common parlance), what would you do with it?

The Student:
I would apply it in turn to each line, and setting aside the difference in color, I would see whether they are concordant in direction.

The Teacher:
Then do the same in applying the fourteen letters of Figure V to particulars, and you will know which, and how many particulars are contained in the letters, without any difficulty, and with the same certainty with which you detect the directions of lines with your ruler. Now the directions in the lines concord with the direction which is outside the lines in the ruler, due to the necessary concordance of the universal with each particular, so that you will necessarily find out the said differences in particulars, and conversely, you will also find out the directions existing within the hidden universal System of Figure V, due to its concordance with the directions existing outside of it within particular Systems, and the necessary concordance of this universal with the difference of each particular will necessarily lead you to the knowledge of the said difference in particular Systems; and just as the whole universal reveals the whole particular, so, in due proportion, parts of universals reveal parts of particulars.

The Disciple:
Everything you have said, Father, is very clear to my eyes in the universal, but my sight is blurred when descending to particulars.

The Teacher:
Then let us descend to the sensual level so that you can ascend to the intellectual level. In Figure V, the eyes see the difference and concordance existing between the inner and outer circles; the difference consists in the fact that the letters are universal, whereas nouns composed of letters are particular. Further, there are differences between individual letters and between individual nouns. The concordance lies in the fact that there are two sets of seven letters and two sets of seven nouns. Further, the eyes see a difference between green and red, and see the concordance of colors in the letters and nouns. And as the intellectual sight sees more than sensual sight, it sees the entire green triangle in V, as it sees the differences among virtues, between virtues and vices and among the vices; it sees concordance among virtues and concordance among vices, and contrariety between virtues and vices. Once the intellectual sight has seen this in particulars, it ascends to the universal level of the letters where it sees difference, concordance and contrariety among particulars, among particulars and universals, and among universals.

The intellectual sight then considers that number seven in which it sees hidden the numbers three and four, and thus it discovers Figures S and T in Figure V; and as S and T each contain two figures, one of which is manifest and consists of the principles, while the other is hidden and consists of the elements, and Figure V also contains two figures, one is manifest and consists of the BCD etc. of the virtues and vices; the other is hidden and consists of BCD etc. of the elements. Therefore, in the difference between the two kinds of BCD etc. it discovers concordance in the number seven, whereby there are seven elements just as there are seven virtues and vices; and just as there are seven virtues opposed to seven vices, so there are seven elements opposed to seven elements; and just as the blue and red colors signify the contrariety between the seven blue V's and the seven red V's, so they are also signs of the contrariety existing between seven blue elements and seven red elements.

As sensual and intellectual sight concur in the investigation of the number of Principles and Elements in Figure V, so do they concur in inquiring into the order of the said Principles and Elements; now in the saffron triangle the sensual sight sees majority, minority and equality among virtues and among vices, and in the red triangle it sees the beginning, middle and end of the combined virtues and the combined vices; and the intellectual sight sees the same, but also sees beyond the said triangles, i.e. the saffron and red triangles of the elements; and since the principles and elements cannot exist without these two triangles, and these triangles cannot exist without order, it therefore necessarily sees order in the principles and elements.

The Disciple:
Now that we have discovered the difference, concordance, contrariety, beginning, middle, end, majority, equality, minority and consequently also the number and order of the principles in Figure V, how have we discovered the hidden System of Figure V?

The Teacher:
For my part, we have indeed discovered it, but we still have to investigate another Secret which is greater than the previous one, for without it, you will have wasted the time and effort you spent investigating and discovering this hidden System.

The Disciple:
And what would this be?

The Teacher:
It is the Art of using Systems. Now just as someone builds a guitar, a drum or a cymbal and knows how to dispose the number, order and proportion of strings, and knows the art of tuning and tempering them so they emit sounds proportioned to natural laws, and has a perfect musical system with a perfect instrument with which to display a perfect harmony, but does not yet have the final element, namely the art of producing the harmony for which the medium, or instrument has been ordered; then it is better, by any comparison, to acquire the artifice by learning the latter art, than the former, and even better to learn them both, rather than just the latter.

As this passage says: "like an instrument or a lute is artificially tempered with sensual Art, S likewise needs to be disposed through art and intellectual order so it can function, and inquire within itself and in T, and find a methodical way to gain the ability and knowledge to have the art and method for knowing ATVXYZ; and if this were not so, it would mean that art and method are more compatible with sensual and artificial forms than with natural and intellectual ones, which is impossible, because if it were possible, then artificial, sensual and accidental forms would have greater nobility and dignity than natural, intellectual and essential ones." (Doctor Ilum. in Art. Comp. Inv. Verit. Dist. 1. de Fig. A. fol. 2.) But you will accomplish a far greater work of Art and a greater Secret if you can take the lute of V, built with great artifice, and make its strings give out an intellectual harmony which sounds sweeter than any sensual harmony. Moreover, perfection is greater in the end than in the beginning or the middle, as you know. For if this were not so, the beginning and the middle would not reach toward the end, nor would they repose in it, so that the definition of the end would be false, which is impossible; and thus it follows that the end is more desirable than the beginning or the middle, because there is greater difference and concordance of perfection in the end than in the beginning or the middle. All these universal conditions taken from Figure T can be demonstrated with reference to the definitions of their principles, and thus they are infallible.

The Disciple:
They certainly are, but how can I discern which particular you want to infer from this universal?

The Teacher:
Answer your own question, and you will know what you do not know.

The Disciple:
But how?

The Teacher:
Learn from this example: as the art of producing harmonic sound is the end purpose of the art of building an instrument, and as countless musical particulars can be produced by it, there is obviously more difference and concordance in the end of the art of composition, than in the beginning of the art of building an instrument; now the latter has but one effect in the end, whereas the former has countless effects; and because they all stand under one universal end, all the more delightful as it contains a greater multitude of particulars.

The Disciple:
This is sufficient, Father, I already have the admirable Arcanum; there is still one thing left: namely that you reveal the Art of drawing particulars out of this universal; for the use of the instrument, or System, consists in this.

The Teacher:
These things belong to the third and fifth Chapters, and so I will briefly sum up here what those chapters will expand upon, and so, let us now go on to the Fourth Secret.

The Fourth Secret.
As this Art which we now intend to deal with is an Art of investigation, and a brief compendium for artificially investigating any particular in its universal (Doctor Illum. in Lect. Fig. Art. Dem. de Fig. A,. fol.2. Tom. 3.); and as it is an incomparably greater artifice by far to deduce the effect and the knowledge of the effect from the cause and the knowledge of the cause, than to deduce the cause and the knowledge of the cause from the effect and the knowledge of the effect, given that one and the same cause, by reason of its universality, contains countless effects, to which the Art teaches and demonstrates the way of descending as from the universal to its particulars. But individual effects, in the ascent from them to their cause, as from a particular to its universal, manifest no more than one and the same cause; and this can be seen in the example of the natural analysis of any natural body, whose natural resolution demonstrates and detects one and only one nature and essence of the four elements from which all natural bodies are composed, and in which they can consequently be resolved through natural analysis, "on account of which, this Art was newly discovered so that C may know how to descend to particulars with the art and without using other particulars, even when B has not made them available to memory: and it achieves this in order to avoid wasting time (a waste which would be unavoidable if, before and in addition to learning universal Science, one had to learn particular sciences in order to deduce the particulars of each science from the universal Science, as some of my Commentators would have it) and in order to provide B with an Art and a Rule whereby it knows how to remember, i.e., to provide it with an Art of Memory. Given that the Art of Memory, by reason of natural order, must necessarily come before the Art of Understanding, especially when reading the books of the Sages of Antiquity as well as my books, which cannot be understood, unless each and every part of the material dealing with the secrets of the work which have been dispersed in a calculated way throughout our books, has been located and most firmly retained in memory; and afterward, memory must offer and represent these things to the intellect, so that C, namely the intellect, can use the Art to generate its operation (Doctor Illum. in Art. Univ. Dist. 1. fol. 3. col. 1. de Secr. Fig. S. Tom. 1.), so that the intellect can take this dispersed material which has been previously committed to memory and reunite it again, and put it back in its right natural order.

My Son, this Artifice is so noble and so secret, that none of the Sages ever revealed it before me. Indeed, we can rightly say that this universal Art of knowledge had never been given to anyone by the supernal light; or if it had been conceded to anyone, it was never written down, or the writings never reached us. Read, for instance, the books by Saint Albert, who was the Christian Doctor who gave the best and most perfect presentation of Philosophy, without omitting anything of whatever could be sought out, theoretically or practically, in the naturally knowable universe. When the most excellent Doctor dealt with the Production of Specific Forms, (vid. D. Albert. Li. 2. de Coelo tr. 3 cap. 5. fol. iii. & Metaph. Lib. 11. tract. 3. cap. 7.) whereby natural individuals are determined, he attributed the production of these specific forms to heaven; but he did not state explicitly which heaven he meant, and the way in which these specific forms are produced was something which he either did not know, or did not teach. This is the very Arcanum which conceals the entire Art of descending from universals to particulars.

In order to make this Art and its entire process visible to the eyes of my Sons, I always used the utmost subtlety in concealing the Elemental Figure beneath each and every Figure of my Art. "This Figure is most necessary in every way in this Art, because through it, the Artist is directed to the knowledge of the remaining figures; and this is because natural operations are the signifiers of the intrinsic and extrinsic operations of ASV, as T discourses through the Elemental Figure and through ASV together with XY." (Doctor Illum. in Art. Dem. Dist. 1. de 2. Fig. elem. fol. 6. Tom. 3.) Hence, in order to know the intrinsic and extrinsic operations of ASV, one must first know the intrinsic and extrinsic operations of Nature, beginning with the Chaos as the supreme Universal of Nature, and descending to single particulars gradually step by step: For this purpose, "through the process of the second elemental figure, the position called Chaos can be clearly demonstrated". On this matter, I compiled an entire Book which is found in Tome 3. In it, the entire process of nature in its descent from universals to particulars and its ascent from particulars to universals is demonstrated with the utmost clarity; and I could not recommend too highly that you lovingly ruminate the said book, in which you will find many admirable things, never before dealt with by any Philosopher, ancient or modern.

This Chaos is divided into three degrees (fol. 4. col. 2. n. 1.) In the first degree, "there are causal seeds, namely natural genera, species, differences, properties, and accidents as well as universal form and prime matter, as we said, and also majority, equality, minority, beginning, middle, end, and all natural forms, both substantial and accidental. In this, what we call the first degree, God created whatever naturally exists in physical bodies. And this was done through the modes of potentiality, actuality, habit, disposition, appetite etc. so that this Chaos be sufficient for the natural agent to draw upon for whatever it needs, for the generation and conservation of species." In this first degree of Chaos there are also ten Predicates (ibid. fol. 26. to 42.) which are included in the causal seeds (fol. 40. n. 7.) Especially helpful in attaining our goal, is the natural method of descending from universals to particulars and conversely, ascending from particulars to universals; and to enable you to imitate it in your method of intellectual operation, you should read the following: namely, you should read and understand the Chapter on the intrinsic and extrinsic Operation of Chaos (fol. 12), the Generation and Corruption of Chaos (fol. 8.), The Universal Transmutation of Form and Matter in Chaos (fol. 11.), Mixture and Virtue in Chaos (fol. 13.), Universal and Particular Chaos (fol. 18.).

In the first Chaos is situated the motive power which we discussed earlier: "this is the universal motive power under which Chaos is aggregated and composed; and so it follows that as universal form moves in universal matter, i.e. in prime matter, it moves all the natural forms that rule over the secondary matters situated in the third Chaos. (Doctor Illum. in Liber Chaos cap. de situ fol. 39. )

In the same Chaos, the vegetative power is also situated: "Four acts are situated in the vegetative, namely: attraction, retention, digestion and expulsion." (Doctor Illum. ibid. fol. 39. n. 1.) You must have learned all these things, as well as the theory of the entire Book on Chaos, before you presume to achieve the intentional or real practice of descending from universals to particulars or ascending from particulars to universals. The real practice is taught to you in my Liber de Principiis Philosophiae which is found in the first Tome and therefore I propose to you that you imprint it in your memory and masticate it with your intellect, if you love demonstrations which are both intellectual and sensual more than those of only one kind or the other in this whole physical process.

For investigating particulars in their universals, it is also most necessary to note that the causal seeds, namely the five universals and ten predicates (Doctor Illum. ibid. fol. 40. de hab. ch. n. 7.) which, according to my School, are real entities, meaning that they are universal; and they are not merely logical, but physical, which means that they exist outside the intellect, as I taught throughout the whole Book on Chaos, and in many places in my other books; and so they truly behave like other seeds; now just as from a seed of, for instance, wheat, or pear, or any other plant, as from the universal, the particular which was previously hidden in a potential state in the seed is brought into act by means of the motive power moved by both specific and general vegetative power, and the entire differentiation of the many parts of this particular, which were in a state of confusion in the third degree of Chaos of the seed, is brought to light, and likewise, from the said causal seeds, as from supreme physical universals, by means of the motive power moved by both general and specific vegetative power, by either artifice or nature alone, or by nature and art together, distinct individual particulars which were previously hidden in a potential state in the causal seeds, are brought into act as intended by nature alone, or by nature together with art, and the entire differentiation of these particulars and of their parts, which existed in a confused state in the first, or in the first and third degrees in the Chaos of the causal seeds, is brought to light.

The Disciple:
As these things are difficult to understand, they are that much more difficult to do.

The Teacher:
As ignorance means difficulty and science means facility, something most difficult for the ignorant is perfectly easy for someone who knows. But as ignorance comes in the beginning and science comes at the end, "and one cannot get from the beginning to the end without a medium etc. which means that you, as you begin to learn this Art, cannot destroy your ignorance of this Art without a means, and this means consists in the conditions of the above Trees and Figures, through which your intellect must pass if you want to know this Art in the end. (Doctor Illumin. in Lib. Princ. Med. Dist. 2, cap. 8. fol. 11.) But lest I appear to be placing the entirety of this burden on your arms, let me explain what was said up to now with the following metaphor, and at the same time show you the method, or art of descending from universals to particulars, by taking an example from Grammar and Music. In Grammar there are twenty-four letters of the alphabet which suffice for the entire grammatical System, and which I now call the scale of Grammar; and in music there are seven sonorous letters which suffice for the complete musical System, and I call this the musical scale. These two scales are the universal from which you descend to any particular. Therefore the method, or art of descending consists in correctly combining the letters with each other.

The Disciple:
It is easy to do this correctly in Grammar, but not so easy in Music.

The Teacher:
Why?

The Disciple:
Because grammatical letters can be combined at pleasure, insofar as a syllable is produced by joining a consonant to a vowel, or conversely, or by not joining a consonant to another consonant without a vowel, these combinations will always yield syllables, but musical syllables cannot be produced so easily by art.

The Teacher:
As easily, or if you prefer, even more easily.

The Disciple:
Please demonstrate.

The Teacher:
Given that Art is a habit which operates with right reason, "the Art, as such, is the right measure for carrying out operations, inasmuch as it revolves around them in order to regulate them and predefine or predetermine their methods." (Doctor Illum. in Introd. Art. Dem. cap. 1. fol. 2. To. 3.) and as such, it directs the rational Artist to operate correctly and easily. "Now Art and Science have this in common: they both make it easier for powers to do their work." (Doctor Illum. ibid.) And if this applies to the haphazard discovery of artificial things where reason plays no role, it applies even more to natural works, and to works that are both natural and artificial, as these two are never done without reason, because they are governed by D of the Principles of Philosophy, namely Intelligence.

Let me illustrate this with an example. You see, my Son, how easily and quickly someone who has learned to play the organ and is a Master in the Art, can move the keys of the keyboard to express any given theme, even though your keyboard has not up to now been formed according to natural rules, and the entire musical System is not rational, as will be demonstrated in the next Chapter; then what do you think he could do with a perfectly ordered System? Further, in the musical alphabet there are only four letters and three syllables, whereas the grammatical alphabet has twenty-four, and many more syllables, it is obvious to the senses that working with four is easier than working with twenty-four.

The Disciple:
Father, you just enumerated seven musical letters or seven degrees, and now you only have four. How can this be right?

The Teacher:
This is a Secret of the Art which you should understand as follows. Given that the supreme principle of ternary number belongs to GOD alone, and the number four comes right next after three, the fourfold principle is the first and supreme principle belonging to creatures; and thus there are four elements in corporeal nature, and there are four sounds in Music, which are the four Elements of Music, namely unison, the third, the fifth and the octave. And as all natural corporeal particulars are necessarily composed of these four elements, so likewise all natural musical particulars are composed of the four. Understand, my Son, that this property is common not only to Physics and Music, but to every Art and Science, for every proportion found in any one of them must necessarily be found in all the others.

Further, you should note that conversely, just as in Music, the seven letters constituting the diatonic scale are produced from the four letters mentioned earlier, likewise, in nature, through the four Elements, are produced seven elements which constitute the natural scale through which, in which and from which, as from a universal, spring all natural particulars, in the same way as all musical particulars originate in the musical scale.

The Disciple:
Therefore the number seven of the principles of Figure V is a metaphor which discloses all the said Secrets?

The Teacher:
These, and many others.

The Disciple:
Is it possible, Father, to deduce and demonstrate all geometric particulars from as few as four or seven universal principles?

The Teacher:
It is entirely possible, and I will give you some samples of this in the next Chapter, in the parts on Music and Geometry, and also with reference to other matters in the last Chapter.

The Disciple:
What more can be expected from your Art by those who delight in methodical demonstrations! I cannot see how they could have believed up to now that your Art has no such method.

The Teacher:
In summary, to straighten crooked paths and make rough ways smooth, I will show you the plainest, smoothest and easiest way to investigate and discover countless particulars in a few universals: take the four preceding Trees, and place in them Figure V and the other Figures, namely ASTX, following the order of the Trees. Now in the first Tree you will have the Universal; in the second you will have the Particular; in the third, the Mode of Existing and Operating, or descending, ascending and circulating; in the fourth is situated the Orderly Disposition of the Power toward the Object; in the third is located the Orderly Disposition of the intermediary act between the Power and the Object; in the second and first resides the Orderly Disposition of the Object toward actuality and potentiality. In the first Tree we have the Universal Scale of three and four, which make up the desired seven, and it is united to the particular Scale, so that the concordance between both can serve as a medium of transition from the one to the other. In the second Tree we have the particular Scale, and just as the universal of the first Scale consists of genus and species, so does the particular of the second scale consist of species and individuals. In the third Tree we have the Scale of Operations. The Scale of the Power is in the fourth Tree.

My Son, the Trees are connected to the Figures, and the Figures to the Trees, and both to the following Tables, and the Tables to them, like the links in a chain: "now just as the parts of a chain or a coat of mail are chained or linked together, likewise, in demonstrative Science, some principles spring from other principles, and some principles reveal other principles: therefore, the revelation of the above principles is sufficient for you to know the other principles." (Doctor Illum. in Lib. Princ. Med. Dist. 5. cap. 15. fol. 24.) Oh, my Son, how your Soul will rejoice when you taste these things, which are obscure enough here on account of brevity, at their source, namely when you read the third Volume of the Great Book of Contemplation, book four, where the matter is recounted and illustrated through examples in many chapters.

The Disciple:
Indeed, most loving Father, I have tasted and seen, and after having tasted the sweetness of this celestial doctrine, all mundane science tastes bitter to me.

Lullianarts.net

You are here: Index location Esoteric Wisdom location An excerpt from Ivo Salzinger's Revelatio Secretorum Artis

Help this page become a success Join myself and many other people around the world:
Please Share This Page Now:


Copy and Paste into Your Website:
<a href=" "> </a>

Many Thanks and Best Wishes


Established 2002. Copyright © 2016 - All Rights Reserved - VirtueScience.com
Privacy Policy | About | Contact