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List of Vices

This list of vices and their rough dictionary definitions are merely a raw resource for deeper Virtuescience work. They are part of the froth of ordinary language which covers the beautiful unchanging conceptual symmetries which lie beneath.

(Alphabetical Order)

Anger: Strong passion or emotion of displeasure or antagonism , excited by real or supposed injury or insult to one ' self or others , or by the intent to do such injury.
Arrogance: Making undue claims in an overbearing manner; that species of pride which consists in exorbitant claims of rank, dignity, estimation, or power, or which exalts the worth or importance of the person to an undue degree; proud contempt of others; lordliness; haughtiness; self-assumption; presumption.
Bragging: exhibiting self-importance, boastful talk.
Cowardice: Lack of courage to face danger; extreme timidity; base fear of danger or hurt; lack of spirit.
Disloyalty: Lack of loyalty; lack of fidelity; violation of allegiance.
Doubt: Lack of Trust and confidence. To suspect; to fear; to be apprehensive.
Envy: A feeling of discontent and resentment aroused by and in conjunction with desire for the possessions or qualities of another.
Greed: An excessive desire to acquire or possess more than what one needs or deserves, especially with respect to material wealth.
Injustice: The practice of being unjust or unfair.
Impatience: The quality of being impatient; want of endurance of pain, suffering, opposition, or delay; eagerness for change, or for something expected; restlessness; chafing of spirit; fretfulness; passion
Jealousy: The quality of being jealous; earnest concern or solicitude; painful apprehension of rivalship in cases nearly affecting one's happiness; painful suspicion of the faithfulness of husband, wife, or lover.
Recklessness: Wild carelessness and disregard for consequences. Insufficient consideration.
Sloth: Aversion to work or exertion; laziness; indolence.
Untrustworthiness: The trait of not deserving trust or confidence
Vanity: Inflated pride in oneself or one's appearance.
Weakness: The quality or state of being weak; want of strength or firmness; lack of vigor; want of resolution or of moral strength; feebleness.
Wrath: Forceful, often vindictive anger.


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Results for character virtue

Character Strengths and Virtues: A Handbook and Classification
by Christopher Peterson, Martin Seligman
$84.00
$54.25 new/used

"Character" has become a front-and-center topic in contemporary discourse, but this term does not have a fixed meaning. Character may be simply defined by what someone does not do, but a more active and thorough definition is necessary, one that addresses certain vital questions. Is character a singular characteristic of an individual, or is it composed of different aspects? Does character--however we define it--exist in degrees, or is it simply something one happens to have? How can character be developed? Can it be learned? Relatedly, can it be taught, and who might be the most effective teacher? What roles are played by family, schools, the media, religion, and the larger culture? This groundbreaking handbook of character strengths and virtues is the first progress report from a prestigious group of researchers who have undertaken the systematic classification and measurement of widely valued positive traits. They approach good character in terms of separate strengths-authenticity, persistence, kindness, gratitude, hope, humor, and so on-each of which exists in degrees.

Character Strengths and Virtues classifies twenty-four specific strengths under six broad virtues that consistently emerge across history and culture: wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and transcendence. Each strength is thoroughly examined in its own chapter, with special attention to its meaning, explanation, measurement, causes, correlates, consequences, and development across the life span, as well as to strategies for its deliberate cultivation. This book demands the attention of anyone interested in psychology and what it can teach about the good life.
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Lighter as We Go: Virtues, Character Strengths, and Aging
by Mindy Greenstein, Jimmie Holland
$27.95
$10.24 new/used

The fears of aging have been one long cascading domino effect through the years: twenty year-olds dread thirty; forty year-olds fear fifty; sixty fears seventy, and so it goes. And there is something to worry about, though it isn't what you'd expect: research shows that having a bad attitude toward aging when we're young is associated with poorer health when we're older.

These worries tend to peak in midlife; but in Lighter as We Go, Mindy Greenstein and Jimmie Holland show us that, contrary to common wisdom, our sense of well-being actually increases with our age--often even in the presence of illness or disability. For the first time, Greenstein and Holland--on a joint venture between an 85 year-old and a fifty year-old--explore positive psychology concepts of character strengths and virtues to unveil how and why, through the course of a lifetime, we learn who we are as we go. Drawing from the authors' own personal, intergenerational friendship, as well as a broad array of research from many different areas--including social psychology, anthropology, neuroscience, humanities, psychiatry, and gerontology--Lighter as We Go introduces compassion, justice, community, and culture to help calm our cascading fears of aging.
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Character Strengths Matter: How to Live a Full Life (Positive Psychology News)
by Shannon Polly, Kathryn H. Britton
$18.95
$15.15 new/used

What are the elements of good character? The Values in Action (VIA) project identified 24 qualities such as creative, authentic, loving, forgiving, kind, persistent, prudent, and brave, calling them character strengths. Character strengths are elements of good character valued across time and around the world. If you are curious about your own strengths, join the 3 million people that have taken the free online survey at www.viacharacter.org.

Character Strengths Matter: How to Live a Full Life brings the 24 character strengths to life with stories involving children, teenagers, adults, and elders and occurring in family life and business settings, in the present and in the distant past, in locations from China to the United States to the Middle East. Research shows that using character strengths in new ways for a week makes people happier up to six months later. This book includes many ideas for using your character strengths in new ways.

Based on the unusual premise that a key way to build strength is to act ?as if? you have that strength already, this book includes short passages to read aloud to try on particular character strengths. This concept is well known to actors and elite athletes, but less well known to the rest of the world. Look inside the book to see whose words are used to embody hope, gratitude, leadership, creativity, kindness, love and all the rest.

More than 30 authors contributed stories to this book, including George Vaillant, the 35-year director of Harvard's Study of Adult Development. Many leaders in the positive psychology field endorse the book, including the ?father of positive psychology? Dr. Martin E. P. Seligman. He writes:
?My friend, Chris Peterson, would have loved this book. It brings to life with personal stories, practical recommendations, wisdom, and humor the dry scholarship that he (with an assist from me) did in Character Strengths and Virtues. Chris was very down-to-earth and I am sure he would have concurred in my enthusiastically recommending this book to everyone who works with character strengths in the real world.? ~ Martin E. P. Seligman, author of Authentic Happiness and Flourish

Proceeds from the sale of this book will be donated to a scholarship at the University of Pennsylvania in honor of the lead researcher of character strengths, the late Christopher Peterson. This scholarship supports the education of future practitioners of positive psychology.

This is the third book in the Positive Psychology News series, joining Resilience: How to Navigate Life's Curves and Gratitude: How to Appreciate Life's Gifts.

Bottom line, this book is bound to make you learn something new, be inspired about humanity and have a chance to play with character strengths. This book will make you happier.


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The Virtues of Captain America: Modern-Day Lessons on Character from a World War II Superhero
$19.95
$10.83 new/used

The first look at the philosophy behind the Captain America comics and movies, publishing in advance of the movie release of Captain America: The Winter Soldier in April 2014. In The Virtues of Captain America, philosopher and long-time comics fan Mark D. White argues that the core principles, compassion, and judgment exhibited by the 1940's comic book character Captain America remain relevant to the modern world. Simply put, "Cap" embodies many of the classical virtues that have been important to us since the days of the ancient Greeks: honesty, courage, loyalty, perseverance, and, perhaps most importantly, honor. Full of entertaining examples from more than 50 years of comic books, White offers some serious philosophical discussions of everyone's favorite patriot in a light-hearted and accessible way. Presents serious arguments on the virtues of Captain America while being written in a light-hearted and often humorous tone Introduces basic concepts in moral and political philosophy to the general reader Utilizes examples from 50 years of comics featuring Captain America, the Avengers, and other Marvel superheroes Affirms the value of "old-fashioned" virtues for the modern world without indulging in nostalgia for times long passed Reveals the importance of the sound principles that America was founded upon Publishing in advance of Captain America: The Winter Soldier out in April 2014.
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Character and Environment: A Virtue-Oriented Approach to Environmental Ethics
by Ronald L. SandlerSearch for Ronald L. Sandler
$27.00
$17.40 new/used

Virtue ethics is now widely recognized as an alternative to Kantian and consequentialist ethical theories. However, moral philosophers have been slow to bring virtue ethics to bear on topics in applied ethics. Moreover, environmental virtue ethics is an underdeveloped area of environmental ethics. Although environmental ethicists often employ virtue-oriented evaluation (such as respect, care, and love for nature) and appeal to role models (such as Henry Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson) for guidance, environmental ethics has not been well informed by contemporary work on virtue ethics.

With Character and Environment, Ronald Sandler remedies each of these deficiencies by bringing together contemporary work on virtue ethics with contemporary work on environmental ethics. He demonstrates the many ways that any ethic of character can and should be informed by environmental considerations. He also develops a pluralistic virtue-oriented environmental ethic that accommodates the richness and complexity of our relationship with the natural environment and provides effective and nuanced guidance on environmental issues.

These projects have implications not only for environmental ethics and virtue ethics but also for moral philosophy more broadly. Ethical theories must be assessed on their theoretical and practical adequacy with respect to all aspects of the human ethical situation: personal, interpersonal, and environmental. To the extent that virtue-oriented ethical theory in general, and Sandler's version of it in particular, provides a superior environmental ethic to other ethical theories, it is to be preferred not just as an environmental ethic but also as an ethical theory. Character and Environment will engage any reader with an interest in environmental ethics, virtue ethics, or moral philosophy.


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The Character of Leadership: Political Realism and Public Virtue in Nonprofit Organizations
by Michael Jinkins, Deborah Bradshaw Jinkins
$35.00
$18.61 new/used

Behold, I send you as sheep in the midst of wolves. Therefore, be as shrewd as snakes, and as innocent as doves. -Matthew 10:16 ...remarkable example of practical humanities scholarship...Those who lead all sorts of nonprofit organizations can benefit from this bracing encounter with political realism. -James Wind, president, Alban Institute and author of Places to WorshipLeaders of nonprofit enterprises are often motivated by a completing vision of how the world should be. Too often, however, this prevents them from understanding and skillfully operating in the realm of pragmatic realism. For nonprofit leaders who want to succeed in their efforts to change the world without selling their souls, Jinkins and Jinkins offer a guide to pragmatic and principled politics.This book includes case studies of the political successes and failures of talented, good-hearted leaders in a variety of roles including seminary presidents, pastors, and leaders of social service agencies. The authors show us that realistic leaders know that in the rough and tumble of the real world, we must strive to create a place where our values can be translated into policy and common life-learning how to do this is the task that confronts us.
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The Fabric of Character: Aristotle's Theory of Virtue (Clarendon Paperbacks)
by Nancy ShermanSearch for Nancy Sherman
$51.00
$28.00 new/used

Most traditional accounts of Aristotle's theory of ethical education neglect its cognitive aspects. This book asserts that, in Aristotle's view, excellence of character comprises both the sentiments and practical reason. Sherman focuses particularly on four aspects of practical reason as they relate to character: moral perception, choicemaking, collaboration, and the development of those capacities in moral education. Throughout the book, she is sensitive to contemporary moral debates, and indicates the extent to which Aristotle's account of practical reason provides an alternative to theories of impartial reason.
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20 Teachable Virtues: Practical Ways to Pass on Lessons of Virtue
by Jerry WyckoffSearch for Jerry Wyckoff
$17.00
$0.01 new/used

How can you be sure that you're teaching your children the lessons of virtue that were passed on to you? Today's parents often feel that they have too little time in their busy schedules to handle such an important task. They're not even sure where to begin. In 20 Teachable Virtues authors Barbara C. Unell and Jerry L. Wyckoff, Ph.D. demonstrate the simple ways that you can teach your children to care about others and about themselves. By using everyday time together, however brief, you can pass on the lessons of virtue that are most important to your familytoday and for generations to come.

At a time when values seem to be on the decline and children are looking to their parents for guidance, this new book argues that the building of a more moral society begins in the home. Through numerous anecdotes and examples, Unell and Wyckoff show parents how a select group of 20 virtues can be instilled, and warn how easily kids can be sent the wrong message.

"To learn to live in society," write the authors, "all children must learn to balance their personal wants against the needs of the social group (family, neighborhood, school, society). Today we see far too few examples of this kind of balance as people put their own wants and needs above all othersall of the time." Through the use of numerous anecdotes which illustrate each virtue, 20 Teachable Virtues shows how common occurrences can become "teachable moments".
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Cat Rules: Virtues of the Feline Character
$14.95
$0.01 new/used

Anyone who owns a feline knows that cats typically rule the roost, the house, and almost everything else! However, cats also possess some inherent, commendable traits that when observed closely, can stir admiration in any mere mortal. Cats are by nature perceptive, serene, playful, intelligent, self-respecting, and of course, curious. In this delightful gift book, these and other essential cat traits are presented through a combination of outstanding photography and motivating quotations, each guaranteed to inspire readers and enchant cat lovers.
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The Road to Character
by David BrooksSearch for David Brooks
$28.00
$12.30 new/used

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

?I wrote this book not sure I could follow the road to character, but I wanted at least to know what the road looks like and how other people have trodden it.??David Brooks

 
With the wisdom, humor, curiosity, and sharp insights that have brought millions of readers to his New York Times column and his previous bestsellers, David Brooks has consistently illuminated our daily lives in surprising and original ways. In The Social Animal, he explored the neuroscience of human connection and how we can flourish together. Now, in The Road to Character, he focuses on the deeper values that should inform our lives. Responding to what he calls the culture of the Big Me, which emphasizes external success, Brooks challenges us, and himself, to rebalance the scales between our ?résumé virtues??achieving wealth, fame, and status?and our ?eulogy virtues,? those that exist at the core of our being: kindness, bravery, honesty, or faithfulness, focusing on what kind of relationships we have formed.
 
Looking to some of the world?s greatest thinkers and inspiring leaders, Brooks explores how, through internal struggle and a sense of their own limitations, they have built a strong inner character. Labor activist Frances Perkins understood the need to suppress parts of herself so that she could be an instrument in a larger cause. Dwight Eisenhower organized his life not around impulsive self-expression but considered self-restraint. Dorothy Day, a devout Catholic convert and champion of the poor, learned as a young woman the vocabulary of simplicity and surrender. Civil rights pioneers A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin learned reticence and the logic of self-discipline, the need to distrust oneself even while waging a noble crusade.
 
Blending psychology, politics, spirituality, and confessional, The Road to Character provides an opportunity for us to rethink our priorities, and strive to build rich inner lives marked by humility and moral depth.
 
?Joy,? David Brooks writes, ?is a byproduct experienced by people who are aiming for something else. But it comes.?

Praise for The Road to Character
 
?Brooks?s gift?as he might put it in his swift, engaging way?is for making obscure but potent social studies research accessible and even startling. . . . A hyper-readable, lucid, often richly detailed human story . . . In the age of the selfie, Brooks wishes to exhort us back to a semiclassical sense of self-restraint, self-erasure, and self-suspicion.??Pico Iyer, The New York Times Book Review

?[Brooks] emerges as a countercultural leader. . . . The literary achievement of The Road to Character is inseparable from the virtues of its author. As the reader, you not only want to know about Frances Perkins or Saint Augustine. You also want to know what Brooks makes of Frances Perkins or Saint Augustine.??Michael Gerson, The Washington Post

?Original and eye-opening . . . At his best, Brooks is a normative version of Malcolm Gladwell, culling from a wide array of scientists and thinkers to weave an idea bigger than the sum of its parts.??USA Today

?There is something affecting in the diligence with which Brooks seeks a cure for his self-diagnosed shallowness by plumbing the depths of others.??Rebecca Mead, The New Yorker
 
?If you want to be reassured that you are special, you will hate this book. But if you like thoughtful polemics, it is worth logging off Facebook to read it.??The Economist
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